Sinclair Dinoland Audio


Struthiomimus (meaning “ostrich mimic”, from the Greek στρούθειος/stroutheios meaning “of the ostrich” and μῖμος/mimos meaning “mimic” or “imitator”) is a genus of  from the late Cretaceous of AlbertaCanada. It was a long-legged, ostrich-like dinosaur.


Trachodon (meaning "rough tooth") is a dubious genus of hadrosaurid dinosaur based on teeth from the Campanian-age Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation of Montana, U.S.[1] It is a historically important genus with a convoluted taxonomy that has been all but abandoned by modern dinosaur paleontologists.[2]

Despite being used for decades as the iconic duckbill dinosaur per antonomasia the material it is based on is composed of teeth from both duckbills and ceratopsids (their teeth have a distinctive double root[3]), and its describer, Joseph Leidy, came to recognize the difference and suggested limiting the genus to what would now be seen as ceratopsid teeth.[2] Restricted to the duckbill teeth, it may have been a lambeosaurine.[4]


Tyrannosaurus (/tᵻˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/ or /taɪˌrænəˈsɔːrəs/, meaning "tyrant lizard", from the Ancient Greek tyrannos (τύραννος), "tyrant", and sauros (σαῦρος), "lizard"[1]) is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex(rex meaning "king" in Latin), is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosaurus lived throughout what is now western North America, on what was then an island continent known as LaramidiaTyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 68 to 66 million years ago.[2] It was the last known member of the tyrannosaurids,[3] and among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.


Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the lateCretaceous period, about 68 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. It is one of the last known non-avian dinosaur genera, and became extinct in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago.[1] The termTriceratops, which literally means "three-horned face", is derived from the Greek τρί- (tri-) meaning "three", κέρας (kéras) meaning "horn", and ὤψ (ops) meaning "face".[2][3]


Ankylosaurus (/ˌæŋkəloʊˈsɔːrəs/ ang-kə-lo-sawr-əs[1]) is a genus of armored dinosaurFossils of Ankylosaurus have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, between about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs. It was named by Barnum Brown in 1908, and the only species classified in the genus is A. magniventris. The genus name means "fused lizard" and the specific name means "great belly". A handful of specimens have been excavated to date, but a complete skeleton has not been discovered. Though other members of Ankylosauria are represented by more extensive fossil material, Ankylosaurus is often considered the archetypal member of its group.


Corythosaurus /ˌkɒrᵻθoʊˈsɔːrəs/ is a genus of hadrosaurid "duck-billed" dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Period, about 77–75.7 million years ago. It lived in what is now North America. Its name means "helmet lizard", derived from Greek κόρυς. It was named and described in 1914 by Barnum BrownCorythosaurus is now thought to be a lambeosaurine, related toNipponosaurusVelafronsHypacrosaurus, and OlorotitanCorythosaurus has an estimated length of 9 metres (30 ft), and has a skull, including the crest, that is 70.8 centimetres (27.9 in) tall.


Ornitholestes (meaning "bird robber") is a small theropod dinosaur of the late Jurassic (Brushy Basin Member of theMorrison Formation, middle Kimmeridgian age, about 154 million years ago[1]) of Western Laurasia (the area that was to become North America).


Stegosaurus (/ˌstɛɡəˈsɔːrəs/[1]) is a type of armored dinosaur. Their fossil bones have been found in rocks dated to the Late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian ages), between 155 and 150 million years ago, in the western United Statesand Portugal. Several species have been classified in the upper Morrison Formation of the western U.S, though only three are universally recognized; S. stenopsS. ungulatus and S. sulcatus. The remains of over 80 individual animals of this genus have been found.[2] Stegosaurus would have lived alongside dinosaurs such as ApatosaurusDiplodocus,BrachiosaurusAllosaurus and Ceratosaurus; the latter two may have been predators of it.


Brontosaurus (/ˌbrɒntəˈsɔːrəs/[1][2] bron-tə-sawr-əs), meaning "thunder lizard" (from Greek βροντή, brontē = thunder + σαυρος, sauros = lizard), is a genus of sauropod dinosaurs. Originally named by its discoverer Othniel Charles Marsh in 1879, Brontosaurus had long been considered a junior synonym of Apatosaurus; its original species Brontosaurus excelsuswas reclassified as A. excelsus in 1903. However, an extensive study published in 2015 by a joint British-Portuguese research team concluded that Brontosaurus was a valid genus of sauropod distinct from Apatosaurus.[3][4][5] Nevertheless, not all paleontologists agree with this division.[6][7]